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Press Coverage

The Anamorphic Stretch Transform: Putting the Squeeze on “Big Data” link pdf

New data compression method reduces big-data bottleneck link link

‘Warping’ compresses big data link pdf

First silicon laser pulses with life link pdf

UCLA Researchers Build World's Fastest Camera to Screen for Cancer link pdf

Ultrafast Camera Could Detect Wandering Cancer Cells link pdf

JAWS Filter Generates Sawtooth link pdf

Two Tools in One link pdf

The Real Sea Monsters link pdf

GigOptix's 100G Modulator link pdf

World's fastest camera link pdf

Debut for world's fastest camera link pdf

New camera 1000 times faster than competitors link pdf

Researchers develop world's fastest bar code reader link pdf

Pure silicon laser debuts link pdf

World's first all-silicon laser link pdf

Californians build first silicon laser link pdf
Click here for a complete list of press coverages.
Open Positions
Postdoc Available
We are looking for highly motivated postdoctoral scholars with excellent academic records. Applicable projects are primarily focused on ultrafast imaging for biomedical applications. Interested candidates should read the jobs page and send their CV to David Borlaug.
Research Opportunities
Exciting projects are available for postdocs, graduate, and undergraduate students. Postdocs and students with fellowships will be given priority. Interested candidates should read the jobs page and send their CV to David Borlaug.
Welcome to the JALALI-LAB @ UCLA
The JALALI-LAB @ UCLA performs multi-disciplinary research and development in the fields of silicon photonics and real-time instruments for biomedical, communication and defense applications. The Lab has two complementary missions. The first is to solve critical problems faced by industry through revolutionary approaches that enable revolutionary advances in performance. The second and equally important mission is to produce creative and highly skilled scientists and engineers who will be the driving force for technological innovation.
News & Announcements
First demonstration of optical real-time data compression
March 17, 2014 – Applied Physics letters link pdf
We experimentally demonstrate the first instrument for compressing the time-bandwidth product of analog signals in real-time. By performing self-adaptive stretch, this technology enables digitizers to capture waveforms beyond their bandwidth with digital data size being reduced at the same time. The compression is lossless and is achieved through a transformation of the signal's complex field, performed in the analog domain prior to digitization. For proof of concept experiments, we compress the modulation bandwidth of an optical signal by 500 times. At the same time, we reduce its modulation time-bandwidth product (i.e., the record length) by 2.73 times while achieving 16?dB power efficiency improvement in comparison to the case of using conventional dispersive Fourier transform. Dispersive data compression addresses the big data problem in real-time instruments and in optical communications.
New Compression Method Reduces Big Data Bottleneck
New discovery is rooted in physics and the arts
December 18, 2013
Big Data refers generally to vast amounts of information collected by networked devices and systems. In this domain, data capture is technologically simple and the challenge lies in the post-capture analytics and transmission. Big Data is also prominent in other domains where the capture of data is challenging as well, such as in the medical sciences, telecom and basic research in the sciences. In these areas, communication signals and scientific phenomena of interest tend to occur on time scales and at throughput levels that are too fast to be sampled and digitized in real time. In other words, the Big Data problem is not just limited to analytics; it also includes data capture, storage, and transmission. Anamorphic Stretch Transform (AST) is a new mathematical transform that offers a solution for Big Data bottleneck, it slows down ultrafast signal so it can be captured with a slower instrument and at the same time it compresses the volume of the resulting data. It does so by reducing the length-bandwidth product. AST can operate on both analog and all-digital data such as on images where it outperforms JPEG and other standard compression techniques. AST is a non-iterative algorithm and does not need any feature detection, feedback.
OPN February 2014 Article News Poster Paper (time domain) Paper (image compression) More Info
2013-09-25 -- Nature Photonics link pdf
Congratulations to Eric Diebold and Brandon Buckley whose work was published in Nature Photonics! Their work was also featured in Nature Methods link pdf. Fluorescence imaging is the most widely used method for unveiling the molecular composition of biological specimens. However, the weak optical emission of fluorescent probes and the trade-off between imaging speed and sensitivity are problematic for acquiring blur-free images of fast phenomena, such as sub-millisecond biochemical dynamics in live cells and tissues, and cells flowing at high speed. Here, we report a technique that achieves real-time pixel readout rates that are one order of magnitude faster than a modern electron multiplier charge-coupled devicethe gold standard in highspeed fluorescence imaging technology. Termed fluorescence imaging using radiofrequency-tagged emission (FIRE), this approach maps the image into the radiofrequency spectrum using the beating of digitally synthesized optical fields. We demonstrate diffraction-limited confocal fluorescence imaging of stationary cells at a frame rate of 4.4 kHz, and fluorescence microscopy in flow at a velocity of 1 m/s, corresponding to a throughput of approximately 50,000 cells per second.
2013-08-15 -- Wiley link pdf
Congratulations to Peter DeVore and David Borlaug whose work was selected for the rear cover of Physica Status Solidi Rapid Research Letters! Modulation instability is a universal nonlinear process wherein a weak perturbation grows on an otherwise quiet background. Inspired by recent work on stimulating modulation instability to tame optical rogues waves, DeVore, Borlaug, and Jalali stimulate it with the weak sidebands of an electrooptically modulated carrier. In this process, the sidebands are boosted at the expense of the carrier, which enables low-voltage, high bandwidth modulation, one of the most pressing needs in optical communications. In the cover figure, we see that a traditional optical link weakly transfers high-frequency radio frequency waves, but the fortuitous increase of modulation instability gain with frequency allows transfer of the full bandwidth.
2013-08-13 -- Interactive Steam Calculator Goes Live link
Serial time-encoded amplified imaging/microscopy (STEAM) is a fast real-time optical imaging method that provides ~10 MHz frame rate, ~100 ps shutter speed, and ~30 dB ( 1000) optical image gain. As of today, STEAM holds world records for shutter speed and frame rate in continuous real-time imaging. STEAM employs the photonic time stretch along with optical image amplification to circumvent the fundamental trade-off between sensitivity and speed that affects virtually all optical imaging and sensing systems. With this calculator, you will be able to determine spatial and temporal resolution of 1D STEAM System. Please click the schematic or link to explore further.
2013-07-18 -- IOP Science link pdf
Rogue events are statistically rare but carry a huge impact. Occurring in everyday contexts such as finance, network traffic, ocean waves and elsewhere. Launching intense pulses into silicon waveguides results in supercontinuum generation, strong nonlinear optical broadening due to a host of complex interactions. This complex mixing of frequencies occasionally results in especially strong broadening, yielding heavy-tailed distribution from what was once Gaussian noise. By stimulating the initial conditions with a well-chosen seed, the broadening can be controlled and stabilized.
2013-06-29 -- Congratulations to David Borlaug for being awarded a PhD Fellowship from Sandia National Labs. The fellowship comes with full time funding and the opportunity to earn significantly more through summer internships. Sandia is aware of our work and is interested in using the fellowship as a platform to build a long term relationship with our lab on a variety of topics. We are proud of David and wish him continued success going forward.
2013-05-24 -- Congratulations to our alumnus and now Professor at the College of Optics (CREOL) in University of Central Florida, Sasan Fathpour, for winning the prestigious Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award. Sasan is known for the first demonstration of nonlinear photovoltaic phenomenon in optics and for energy harvesting in silicon photonics, accomplishments he made in our laboratory. The ONR award recognizes his latest innovative work in the area hybrid silicon-LiNbO3 integrated devices.
2013-05-07 -- Congratulations to Eric Diebold for winning the UCLA Chancellors Postdoctoral Award. Eric won this award for his pioneering contribution to fluorescence microscopy and for the landmark demonstration of the worlds fastest fluorescent camera.
Nature photonics (January 2013): Dispersive Fourier transformation is an emerging measurement technique that overcomes the speed limitations of traditional optical instruments and enables fast continuous single-shot measurements in optical sensing, spectroscopy and imaging. Using chromatic dispersion, dispersive Fourier transformation maps the spectrum of an optical pulse to a temporal waveform whose intensity mimics the spectrum, thus allowing a single-pixel photodetector to capture the spectrum at a scan rate significantly beyond what is possible with conventional space-domain spectrometers. Over the past decade, this method has brought us a new class of real-time instruments the permit the capture of rare events such as optical rogue waves and rare cancer cells in blood, which would otherwise be missed using conventional instruments.
Nature photonics (January 2013): Stochastically driven nonlinear processes are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation and instabilities in numerous natural and artificial systems, including well-known examples such as sand ripples, cloud formations, water waves, animal pigmentation and heart rhythms. Technologically, a type of such self-amplification drives free-electron lasers and optical supercontinuum sources whose radiation qualities, however, suffer from the stochastic origins. Through time-resolved observations, we identify intrinsic properties of these fluctuations that are hidden in ensemble measurements. We acquire single-shot spectra of modulation instability produced by laser pulses in glass fibre at megahertz real-time capture rates. The temporally confined nature of the gain physically limits the number of amplified modes, which form an antibunched arrangement as identified from a statistical analysis of the data. These dynamics provide an example of pattern competition and interaction in confined nonlinear systems.
Our work about the high-throughput single-microparticle imaging flow analyzer has been published in PNAS online and covered in UCLA Newsroom and PNAS's Highlights. The technology can take a picture of every single cell in a microfluidic channel with a record high throughput of 100,000 cells/s and perform non-stop image-based cell classification in real time. It holds promise for a broad range of applications such as high-throughput screening, cancer detection, and stem cell research. The work has been highlighted in TIME Magazine and OPN.
Undergraduate researcher Nora Brackbill received National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship and will attend Stanford University Ph.D. program in September 2013.
Undergraduate researcher Rebecca Brown got admitted to and will attend medical school in July 2013.
Postdoctoral scholar Keisuke Goda (2007-2012) appointed Full Professor at University of Tokyo.
Professor Bahram Jalali received the 2012 Aron Kressel Award from the IEEE photonics society.
Professor Bahram Jalali received The 2012 Distinguished Engineering Achievement Award from The Engineers' Council.
Ali Fard has won the 2011-2012 Electrical Engineering Department's Distinguished Ph.D. Dissertation Award in Physical & Wave Electronics.
Kam Yan Hon's paper titled " The Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Coefficients of Si, Ge, and Si(1-x)Ge(x) in the midwave and longwave infrared" has been selected to be on the cover of Journal of Applied Physics. Congratulations!

Using a combination of semiconductor theory and experimental results from the scientific literature, we have compiled and plotted the key third-order nonlinear optical coefficients of bulk crystalline Si and Ge as a function of wavelength (1.5-6.7 um for Si and 2.0-14.7 um for Ge).
Ali Fard wins SPIE Scholarship. This award recognizes his academic and research excellence in the field of optics and photonics. Congratulations!
Keisuke Goda wins Burroughs Welcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface! The purpose of this award is to bridge advanced postdoctoral training and the first three years of faculty service. Congratulations!
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